Thinking About the Timber Frame Home You Want to Live In

With careful planning, your new home design will reflect the way you want to live.  We’ve listed some areas below that will help you think through your “must haves” as well as what you desire in a home.

Think about how you’d like the home to feel.  Talk about your lifestyle, how you like to entertain and which rooms you spend the most time in.  How do you want life to be different in your new home?  Do you want to create an outdoor living space?  Thoughtful planning in the design phase will result in a home that truly works for you.

Our timber frame home designer will listen to your ideas, and ask some questions.  The task at hand is to guide you through the maze of wants vs. needs and cost vs. budget.  With our knowledge and expertise, we promise you a well designed custom timber frames home to fit your budget.

1. Is this new timber frame home a single story home?  Do you need a basement, or just a crawl space?  How would you describe your building site?  We prefer to do site visits before the design process begins.

2. Do you prefer an open floor plan with the kitchen and dining areas combined with living areas?  Or do you favor separate rooms with easy traffic flow?

3. What is a comfortable ceiling height for you?  Would this new home have cathedral ceilings?

4. How do you entertain? Is the family / living room the main gathering place, or is it the kitchen?  Do you need a formal dining area?

5. Do you require a spot for a piano or large pool table?  How about other large pieces of furniture or wall art?

6. Are you a reader and have lots of books?  Is there a need for a quiet room away from the rest of the house, such as an office or library?  Need a space for crafts?

7. What type of heating / cooling system do you see in your new home? Do you intend to heat with a wood stove primarily, or for back-up? Are you interested in using ceiling fans?

8. How important is the need for a mud room or larger than average laundry room?

9. How important is the kitchen in your home?  Are you a person who frequently cooks and needs lots of counter space or large island?  Is a big pantry in order?

10. How do you envision the master bedroom?  Is it just a place to sleep, or do you need a space for reading chairs or a desk?  Is access to the outside important in this room?

11. Do your bedrooms need large walk-in closets, or just standard size closets?  For storage considerations, do you need larger and / or more closets or see some built-in furniture?

12. How important is the size of the master bathroom?  What are your requirements?  How many other bathrooms do you need?  How large?

13. Windows can be a large portion of your budget.  Does your property have views that you want to take advantage of? Are there areas of the home where you see a need for custom windows?

14. Is an attached garage a necessity, or do you prefer a detached garage that can serve multiple purposes? How large do you need this space?

15. Outdoor living areas range from attached covered porches and / or terraces to landscaped gardens with a pavilion a short walk from the main house.  Describe how you see your home and lifestyle fitting into these transition areas.

After you have answered most of the questions here, let us sit down together and go over your ideas.  We will listen to your requests and make suitable suggestions that we think will help save you money or steps in your building process.  Together, we can be a team that has your best interest at heart.  Together, we can craft this timber frame home based on your thoughtful ideas combined with our creative talents.

Click here to get started now!

The English Mediaeval House

The English Mediaeval House 

By: Margaret Wood – Preface by Sir Mortimer Wheeler

Bracken Books – 1965

In this book you will find an absorbing study of the evolution of the English house.  Filled with Margaret Wood and other workers’ meticulous research, the book covers the period of time from the Norman Conquest to 1540.  Sixty pages of beautiful and instructive photographs are included as well as 150 plans and drawings that can only enhance such a wonderful book. This is the first major book on medieval domestic architecture for over a hundred years and is definitely worthy of its great subject!

 

Manor Houses in Normandy

Manor Houses in Normandy

By: Yves Lexcroart
Photographs By: Regis Faucon

Konemann – 1995

Open this book and you will be blown away by beautiful photographs that have captured the undulating woodland and lush meadows of Normandy.  Pays d’Auge is a region of Normandy that is a treasure-house of architecture in which the amazing manor houses are among its best-kept secrets.  Some are surprisingly small and some very grand.  They are built of timber or brick and stone. Very few of the manor houses are open to the public so grab this unique opportunity and enjoy this breathtaking pocket of Normandy.

Timber Surface Treatments

By: Bruce Gardner, Co-Owner of Homestead Timber Frames

The first decision to make regarding the look of your finished timber frame is the texture of the timber surfaces.  Here are some of your choices:

Smoothly Planed – This most common choice is the result of a portable planer, sharp blades, and patient technique.  The timber framer sets the planer blade height to a minimum setting to minimize grain tear – out and planes each visible timber surface while advancing slowly.  Areas around knots may require additional attention from a belt sander.

Sand Blasted – Timber frame timbers can be sand blasted to mimic weathered timber surfaces without the graying.  A steady stream of an abrasive agent such as sand or baking soda is directed under pressure against the timber surfaces.  The abrasive agent removes the softer ‘early wood’ leaving the ‘late wood’.  The result is a timber surface that looks and feels like corduroy with the ‘late wood’ grain raised.

Hand Hewn – Best described under the heading, “How to make a timber framer wince”, this surface treatment is achieved by using an adze.  The adze wielder chops along the length of the timber taking small divots of wood.  The aim here is to replicate a timber that was produced by hand from the log.

Rough Sawn –  Timbers are joined straight from the saw mill, saw marks and rough grain intact.  Barns and sheds often display timbers that are rough sawn.

Knoxville Boat Show 2014

Homestead Timber Frames will be participating in the 2014 Downtown Knoxville Boat Show.  The show is March 6 – 9, 2014. We will be in the Southern Shores Development’s booth.   We would love to see you all there! Please come visit us and enjoy the show!!

Click here to visit the
Downtown Knoxville Boat Show Website

KNOXVILLE CONVENTION CENTER

701 Henley Street
Knoxville, TN 37902
PH: 865.522.5669  |  FX: 865.329.0422

2014 BOAT SHOW SCHEDULE

Thur March 6, 2:00pm – 9:00pm
Fri March 7, 12:00pm – 9:00pm
Sat March 8, 10:00am – 9:00pm
Sun March 9, 11:00am – 5:00pm

SHOW ADMISSION

General Admission
$7.00 Adults
Children under 10 – Free

TICKETS (CASH ONLY) ARE AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR FOR $7.00 (CHILDREN UNDER 10 ARE FREE).

The Framed Houses of Massachusetts Bay, 1625 – 1725

The Framed Houses of Massachusetts Bay, 1625 – 1725

By: Abbott Lowell Cummings

Harvard University Press – 1979

An absolutely superb work of history on the early homes built in North America.  Mr. Cummings covers the English background, the House Plan, the Builders and their Resources and the Assembly and Rearing of the House Frame.  As you can imagine, you will read about our country’s first timber frame homes – some of which are still standing.  Spanning over 200 pages, this book ends with a detailed Appendix where you will find even more books on this splendid form of construction.  You will enjoy the many black and white photos, drawings, and maps of interiors, timber post and girt carvings and furniture of the era.  We use this book as a reference for carvings and timber sizes.

Timberframe – The Art and Craft of the Post-and-Beam Home

Timberframe – The Art and Craft of the Post-and-Beam Home

By: Tedd Benson – Forward by Norm Abram

The Taunton Press – 2001

Tedd gives us another lush book showcasing 23 homes and 6 timber frame additions of varied design which display the warmth, character, and versatility of today’s timber frame home.  Filled with 400 color photographs, drawings, and plans, you have a compelling source of inspiration in your hands.  Great for gathering ideas of what you do like in a timber frame home and especially what you don’t like in a timber frame home.

American Bungalow Style

American Bungalow Style

By: Robert Winter and Alexander Vertikoff

Simon & Schuster – 1996

If you’re looking for some great interior or exterior ideas for cozy nooks, fireplaces, porches, window nooks, etc., then this book can help.  Filled with over 300 color photographs of that charming Craftsman Style architecture, we are immediately drawn to its warmth and effortless design.  “The idea that simplicity and artistry could harmonize in one affordable house spurred the bungalow’s popularity – a rare movement in which good architecture was found outside the world of the wealthy.”  This remains true today – especially with a timber frame home.  Turning the pages of this beautiful book shows you how just a simple door can become a thing of beauty you could enjoy each and every day.

Our Fall Newsletter

The Forgotten Crafts – A Practical Guide to Traditional Skills

The Forgotten CraftsA Practical Guide to Traditional Skills

By: John Seymour

Dorling Kindersley Ltd. – 1980

In this beautiful book John Seymour celebrates traditional crafts in the best possible way – by showing and describing in fascinating detail just how they were done, and by encouraging us to keep them alive.  Filled with old photographs and lovely drawings, this is a fun book to have on the shelf.  John Seymour lived on a farm and worked hard to recreate life as it was so his writings are based on his experiences.  The subjects covered range widely from woodland crafts to workshop crafts and household crafts.  Something for everyone!